Where to Go to Find the Best Visibility in the World

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Ever dream about a diving trip to a remote global destination, only to discover once you descend underwater the vibrant world around you is practically invisible after 20 ft. or so?

Currents, weather conditions and environmental factors all play a role in making a beautiful underwater world difficult to see. But there are some corners of the globe where visibility is consistently clear for 100’, 125’ or even 150’ feet in every direction.

So for your next trip, make sure your views and underwater photos truly capture the extensive world around you and plan a visit to these top international destinations where there are miles of brilliant waters to cover.

Cayman Islands

From the edge of the reefs along the Cayman Islands, these islands will treat divers to clear water vistas that can extend up to 150’ ft. This distance is more than 50 ft. longer than what Caribbean divers may be accustomed to.

Best of all, the long-range visibility makes it easier to spot big animal encounters as they approach. Encounters can be a very common occurrence depending on the site you select.

There are hundreds of sites to choose from including 150 sites off of Grand Cayman alone. You’ll have your pick of wreck dive sites, reefs and even shore diving destinations like Lighthouse Point in West Bay.

Florida Springs

Head to the waters off of Florida’s Panhandle, and you’ll find some of the clearest and best scuba diving conditions in North America waiting.

With consistent 72 degree temperatures, and waters so clear divers often don’t believe they’re below the surface, this destination is filled with vibrantly easy-to-see sites. You will see more than 100 sunken vessels and artificial reefs the old Intracoastal Waterway bridges created.

Head first to the jewel of the scene, the 911’ ft. long USS Oriskany. This former aircraft carrier is an impressive site and is renowned as one of the largest purposely-sunk wrecks in the world.

Hawaii

Hawaii tops the list for countless divers, and the deep blue terrain off of Big Island, Oahu, Maui, Lanai and Kauai presents plenty of crystal clear terrain to explore.

More than 2,500 miles away from the nearest continent, the remote locale means divers can expect encounters with hundreds of unique species, especially the big ones.

Visibility averages 100’ feet or more, and the temps are nicely inviting with mid to high-70s in the winter and low 80s in the summer months. Visitors who aren’t sure where to head first can check out the Big Island’s Kailua-Kona, which is a well-known Mecca for scuba diving.

Palau

Palau is a paradise for exceptional conditions with visibility that regularly extends more the 100 ft. and water temps that hover in the high 70s and low 80s all year round. Palau is found on the edge of the Western Pacific, and located roughly 500 miles away from Indonesia and the Philippines.

There are also more than 1,300 species of fish and more than 800 types of sponges and corals, ensuring divers will have plenty to see at this gorgeous collection of 350 islands. Be sure and bring a good underwater camera with coral gardens, big pelagic encounters and a series of World War II-era wrecks, divers will soon discover that there’s plenty to see in every direction.

Don’t get caught in paradise without the proper gear! Check out our gear section. If you live in the Dallas area, swing by our shop in Carrollton, and we’ll be happy to chat with you!

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Where to Go to Find the Best Visibility in the World
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Currents, weather conditions and environmental factors all play a role in making a beautiful underwater world difficult to see. Plan a visit to these top international destinations where there are miles of brilliant waters to cover.
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2 responses to “Where to Go to Find the Best Visibility in the World”

  1. Mallory Smith says:

    I learned how important visibility is when I earned my certification. We had literally ZERO visibility. It was horrible and very scary.

  2. Sol Stein says:

    Why would you want to scuba without good visibility? Thanks for the list!

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